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About Pair Up

About Pair Up

 

Pair Up is the American Kidney Fund’s new national campaign empowering women to protect themselves— and the people they love— from kidney disease.

Kidney disease is an increasingly common and serious condition that is damaging the health of as many as 31 million Americans— yet relatively few people are aware of kidney disease and the threat that it poses. It has few warning signs in the early stages, and nine out of 10 people with early kidney disease don’t know they have it. Most often caused by diabetes or high blood pressure, kidney disease can lead to heart attack, stroke, kidney failure and death.

Research commissioned by the American Kidney Fund in July 2011 revealed a surprising lack of knowledge about the leading causes of kidney disease. According to the survey, the majority of Americans who care for their loved ones' health are unaware that diabetes and high blood pressure are the leading risk factors for kidney disease:

  • Most survey respondents (85 percent) could not name high blood pressure as a leading cause of kidney disease.  The majority of respondents (74 percent) reported having a loved one with high blood pressure
  • More than two-thirds (69 percent) of respondents could not name diabetes as a leading cause of kidney disease, despite the fact that 55 percent reported having a loved one with diabetes

Even those respondents who had personally been diagnosed with high blood pressure and/or diabetes seemed unaware of their risk for kidney disease:

  • More than two-thirds (67 percent) said they had not been told by a doctor that they were at risk for kidney disease
  • One in four (27 percent) said their doctor had not tested how well their kidneys were working

Most cases of kidney disease could be prevented, but increased awareness and understanding is vital.

Pair Up asks women to join the fight against kidney disease by taking two simple actions:

  • Learn if they’re at risk for kidney disease
  • Spread the word about kidney disease to friends and loved ones who also may be at risk

Why does Pair Up target women?

Women have a unique power to spread the word and raise awareness of this devastating disease. In two-thirds of American households, women are the primary health care decision-makers.[i] When the opportunity exists, women are more likely to take advantage of resources like free community health screenings.[ii] We believe women can be highly effective drivers of kidney disease awareness and prevention for themselves and their friends and loved ones who are at risk.

Although the Pair Up campaign primarily is directed at women, we invite anyone and everyone with a passion for the cause to join us in the fight to prevent kidney disease.

Join Pair Up today!

What’s the meaning of the butterfly logo?

The butterfly is formed of two interlocking kidneys. It’s a symbol of optimism, partnership and support—and that’s what Pair Up is all about.

About the American Kidney Fund 

Pair Up builds on the American Kidney Fund’s long history of fighting kidney disease through direct financial support to patients in need, health education and prevention efforts.

The American Kidney Fund leads the nation in charitable assistance to dialysis patients. Last year, more than 87,000 people—1 out of every 5 U.S. dialysis patients—received assistance from the American Kidney Fund for health insurance premiums and other treatment-related expenses.

The American Kidney Fund also reaches millions of people each year with kidney disease prevention information through public awareness campaigns, free health screenings, health education materials and courses, online outreach, and a toll-free health information HelpLine (866.300.2900).

As a 12-time recipient of the top “Four Star” rating from Charity Navigator, the American Kidney Fund is ranked among the top 1 percent of charities nationwide for fiscal accountability.

For more information, visit www.kidneyfund.org


i. The National Alliance for Caregiving

ii. American Journal of Kidney Diseases, Vol 55, No 3, Suppl 2, 2010: pp S40-S57